# Here to trigger an error
import pytest

# Doing this to be a little sneaky, at least
from A_defining_strings import your_first_name, your_last_name
cap = your_last_name.upper()

def test_name_methods(capsys):
    # Again being a bit funny to grab the print...
    import B_string_methods as B
    assert B.cap_last_name == cap
    assert B.name_len == len(B.cap_last_name) + len(B.your_first_name) + 1
    out, err = capsys.readouterr()
    last_line = out.split('\n')[-2]
    words = last_line.split(', ')
    assert words[0:1] == [B.cap_last_name]
    assert words[1:2] == [B.your_first_name]

# We'll start off by grabbing your names from the last file

from A_defining_strings import your_first_name, your_last_name

# Using string methods
## We're updating our administrative system, so we need to capitalize your last
## name. There's a simple way to do that with a string "method" called .upper()

## Set cap_last_name to an uppercase version of your_last_name

cap_last_name = your_last_name.upper()

## You can print it to see how it looks

print cap_last_name

## And we'll need to check how long your name is to make sure there's enough
## space in our database! Be sure to count a space between your first and last
## name, and use the len() function to compute the lengths

## Put the total length of your name in name_len. You can use multiple steps if
## you like.

name_len = len(your_first_name) + len(your_last_name) + 1



print "We'll need", name_len, "characters for my name"


## Note that we've been using print with commas. This puts a space between each
# We'll start off by grabbing your names from the last file

from A_defining_strings import your_first_name, your_last_name


# Using string methods
## We're updating our administrative system, so we need to capitalize your last
## name. There's a simple way to do that with a string "method" called .upper()

print your_last_name.upper()



## Set cap_last_name to an uppercase version of your_last_name

cap_last_name=your_last_name.upper()

## You can print it to see how it looks

print cap_last_name

## And we'll need to check how long your name is to make sure there's enough
## space in our database! Be sure to count a space between your first and last
## name, and use the len() function to compute the lengths

## Put the total length of your name in name_len. You can use multiple steps if
## you like.

full_name="{} {}".format(your_first_name, your_last_name)

name_len=len(full_name)
# We'll start off by grabbing your names from the last file

from A_defining_strings import your_first_name, your_last_name

# Using string methods
# # We're updating our administrative system, so we need to capitalize your last
## name. There's a simple way to do that with a string "method" called .upper()
print your_last_name.upper()
cap_last_name = your_last_name.upper()
print cap_last_name
## Set cap_last_name to an uppercase version of your_last_name



## You can print it to see how it looks



## And we'll need to check how long your name is to make sure there's enough
## space in our database! Be sure to count a space between your first and last
## name, and use the len() function to compute the lengths
print your_first_name, your_last_name
# full_name = str(your_first_name),str(your_last_name)

full_name = "{} {}".format(your_first_name, your_last_name)
print full_name
name_len = len(full_name)
print name_len
## Put the total length of your name in name_len. You can use multiple steps if
## you like.
# We'll start off by grabbing your names from the last file

from A_defining_strings import your_first_name, your_last_name

# Using string methods
## We're updating our administrative system, so we need to capitalize your last
## name. There's a simple way to do that with a string "method" called .upper()

## Set cap_last_name to an uppercase version of your_last_name
cap_last_name = your_last_name.upper()


## You can print it to see how it looks
print cap_last_name


## And we'll need to check how long your name is to make sure there's enough
## space in our database! Be sure to count a space between your first and last
## name, and use the len() function to compute the lengths

## Put the total length of your name in name_len. You can use multiple steps if
## you like.

name_len = len( your_first_name + ' ' + your_last_name )

print "We'll need", name_len, "characters for my name"


## Note that we've been using print with commas. This puts a space between each
## string or variable. But what if we don't want a space? In this case, we can
## append two strings (including variables) using +. See if you can create a